Columbian women use 'sex strike' to repair roads

  • By Ben Griffin

A group of women from a Columbian town have gone on a 'sex strike' until their local roads are repaired -- a genius move that could benefit motorists from in the UK no end. This marks the second time the ladies from the town of Barbacaos in south-west Columbia have tried to starve their partners of rumpy pumpy in order to get their roads resurfaced.

It may seem like a drastic move, but the roads are in such disrepair that a trip down the town's single track road to the nearest hospital can take 14 hours. "Colombians like to say you go to the end of the Earth and take a left - that's where this place is located," local reporter John Otis explained.

A report claims one women actually lost her unborn baby because the ambulance she was in got stuck while making the journey.

"Why bring children into this world when they can just die without medical attention and we can't even offer them the most basic rights?" strike leader Ruby Quinonez said back when the first sex strike occurred in 2011. "We decided to stop having sex and stop having children until the state fulfils its previous promises."

The 'crossed legs movement' as it is known came about in 2011 after several protests and a hunger strike failed to gain any traction. Only the sex strike caused the government and media to take any notice.

Two years on and the latest sex strike is being used to ensure the US$21million originally promised to pave at least half of the 57km road will be made available.

The last sex strike lasted three months and 19 days and wasn't successful, however reports say the road is actually now being repaired so it looks like the plan has worked.

Columbia has been home to a number of sex strikes in the past, including one instance where the wives and girlfriends denied their gangster husbands any loving in 2006 in the town of Pereira.

Perhaps a sex strike is just what Britain needs to vanquish the dreaded pothole once and for all?

Source: AOL Cars

Image: Flickr

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