The Nexus 7 kicked the Jelly Bean story off back in June when Google revealed that for the first time, they’d partnered with Asus to produce a 7-inch tablet built with the explicit purpose of showcasing Android 4.1. The Nexus 7 hit the market not long after and showed the world that affordable, powerful hardware in a compact body was the recipe for success in a competitive tablet market, going on to break tablet sales records at retailers the world over.

Despite the 7-inch tab effectively lighting a fire under Apple to produce the iPad Mini as some form of retort, it was the Cupertino-based company who already held the throne in the larger tablet space, with the amazingly successful iPad. Not to be outdone, Google’s latest creation along with the LG-made Nexus 4 smartphone was the Nexus 10, Google’s first larger tablet which takes the fight back to Apple.

Samsung Google Nexus 10

The Nexus 10, which went on sale today, has already seen high demand here in the UK with the larger 32GB model selling out by mid-morning and stock of the smaller 16GB variety likely to follow suit in the coming hours. The tablet is Google’s second Nexus device created alongside Korean manufacturer Samsung (the other being the Samsung Galaxy Nexus) and indeed, it utilises powerful Samsung-made hardware in the form of its processor and display. So what else does it offer?

What specifications does the Samsung Nexus 10 have?

Google’s new larger tablet has an array of features which aim to give it the edge over some significant competition. Along with its class winning display resolution, the Nexus 10 also follows the trend of Google products aiming to offer affordable quality.

  • Screen: 10.055-inch HD (2560x1600) WQXGA display (with Corning Gorilla Glass 2 on top)
  • Processor: Exynos 5 Dual 1.7GHz dual-core Cortex A15 chip
  • RAM: 2GB
  • Memory: 16GB/32GB
  • Camera: 5-megapixel rear, 1.9-megapixel front-facing
  • Connectivity: WiFi, Bluetooth, NFC, microHDMI
  • Battery: 9000mAh

What operating system does the Samsung Nexus 10 run?

Part of the appeal of the Nexus 10 is that it, along with the Nexus 7, is one of the first tablets to run Android 4.2 Jelly Bean. It along with the new Nexus 4 smartphone are fresh on the scene, whilst the marginally older Nexus 7 served as the debut device to the original version of JB; Android 4.1 a few months back. The latest version of Jelly Bean adds new features like Photo Sphere, an improved version of Google Now and the tablet experience now supports multiple logins, each with their own user space, all of which adds to an already more refined Android experience.

What are the alternatives?

If it isn’t clear, elements like that amazingly high 300ppi resolution display are likely there specifically to out-do the latest iPad, but many would argue that display resolution at this stage is nearing imperceptible quality, meaning the fight really boils down to the preferred user experience. If the neither the Nexus 10, nor the iPad tickle your fancy, then some other offerings from the likes of Samsung might be worth considering. The Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 supports Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and features a special Wacom-made digitizer which allows for incredibly precise input and 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity when used in conjunction with the integrated S Pen stylus.

When will the Samsung Nexus 10 be available?

As we said up top, the Nexus 10 became available directly from Google today and the smaller 16GB option is the only model still available with the supply of 32GB tabs being exhausted this morning, alongside Google’s stock of Nexus 4 smartphones which were all sold in the first half an hour.

What do we think?

It’s hard not to think that Google commissioned the Nexus 10, purely to take on the Apple iPad and in many ways that’s no bad thing; ‘competition breeds innovation’ and in the opinion of some, the high res display is a step in the right direction. What’s more the price is Google’s biggest strength, with the 16GB Nexus 10 retailing for just £319, £80 less than the equivalent iPad. Until we see some serious user feedback and get a chance to tango with the Nexus 10 ourselves, we’ll reserve judgement, but the Android user within us can’t help but crack a smile in anticipation.