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Brits most likely to call their car ‘Betty’

We hate to say it, but it seems the British are a bit predictable when it comes to naming their cars – especially the blokes among us.

If you think naming your car is uncommon, think again. One in five ‘christen’ their four-wheeled pride and joy, with women marginally more likely to than men. Those aged over 55, meanwhile, are half as likely as the national average.

The most popular name for a car is Betty, followed by Betsy and Lucy. The first male name in the list is Herby (a reference to the classic VW Beetle from the Disney movies) followed by Bob. Then there’s Sally, Bessie, Daisy, Foxy and Pablo, respectively.

Less popular but much more original names from the 2,000 respondents aged 18 and over included BJ (not a reference to Britain’s Foreign Secretary), Passion Wagon (it gets worse) and Nemo (the fish from Finding Nemo).

Weirder still are Frapuchini, Gladys, Nooka the Nook, Snozzles, Custard, Toadzilla and, best of all, Lord Thaodin of Rohan, which just rolls off the tongue.

In terms of name inspiration, 20 per cent of people rely on the letters and numbers in their number plate, which breaks down to 26 per cent of men and 15 per cent of women. 18 per cent of motorists derive the name from the car’s colour.

One in ten name their car after a book or character, while the same proportion borrow from a celebrity or famous person, with men more than three times more likely to do this (16 per cent versus 5 per cent).

A spokesperson for Ocean Finance, the loan and mortgage broker that commissioned the survey, Ian Williams, commented: “Us Brits love to bring our cars to life by giving them a name – and the names we give them are weird and whacky, well-known and wonderful.

He added: “From the make and model of the car, family members and instinct, to simplicity, sarcasm and football teams, our study shows there’s no end to car-naming triggers.” Got a favourite car name that isn’t Betty? Let us know in the comments.

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