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Does basic car maintenance confuse you? You are not alone

A recent survey has found 51 per cent of motorists admit they find even the mot basic car repairs confusing.

Not only that, a further 36 per cent admitted they had no idea what the majority of dashboard symbols meant, according to the survey by Kwik Fit.

42 per cent, meanwhile, said they had no idea how to change a flat tyre and a staggering 85 per cent had absolutely no idea what MOT means (it’s the Ministry of Transport Test).

On the subject of keeping your car road legal, 21 per cent thought passing an MOT meant a car is safe to drive for a year, ignoring the fact a car can become unsafe in between tests and it is up to the owner to ensure road worthiness.

Perhaps the most bizarre survey result of all is the fact 2 per cent thought leaving the lights on would stop a vehicle from freezing over, according to the 2,000 motorists surveyed.

LeasePlan UK offered up six ways to keep your car in good shape. It said to check tyre pressures (usually recommended on the tyre wall) and ensure your tyre tread is above the legal minimum of 1.6mm.

It also advised checking fluid levels in your car, including washer and oil levels, replace your windscreen wiper blades whenever you notice a decline in visibility, ensure all internal and external warning lights are working and check all seat belts and fasteners are in working order.

Lease Plan UK account director Jennifer Gradden said: “There is a worrying level of motorists in the UK who are baffled by car maintenance.

“It’s hugely important to maintain the upkeep of a vehicle, not only to conserve its value and improve fuel economy, but also because poor maintenance can be dangerous and potentially cause an accident.”

She added: “In many cases, vehicle faults can be identified by a simple walk-around check or by the driver noticing a difference in the handling of the vehicle.”

Kwik Fit representative Paul Boulton added: “The level of misunderstanding around what keeps our cars running safely is pretty shocking. The industry should be doing more to demystify these misconceptions.”

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