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Workers more likely to take a job if offered a company car

More than a quarter of British workers would be much more likely to take a job if offered a company car, a new survey of employment benefits has revealed.

30 per cent of 1,500 Brits in full-time employment rated a company car as one of the most desirable benefits, with tenth place and 13 per cent of the vote going to a company car allowance and seventh place and 17 per cent of the vote was having a company car provided.

Young people were particularly partial to the offer of a company ride, with 33 per cent of those aged between 17 and 24 years old saying it would make them more likely to accept a job, while a quarter went as far to say it was the most appealing benefit of all.

68 per cent of men would accept a job based on the offer of a company car, which is 10 per cent more than for women, suggesting the fairer sex has a more take it or leave it attitude when it comes to their car.

From a geographical perspective, those living in Northern Ireland were most swayed by the prospect, with nearly 40 per cent rating it is an important benefit.

The chance to have a car paid for by an employer was found to be a ‘powerful way’ to retain staff, too, with nearly two thirds of respondents saying they would likely stick around if they were given a set of work wheels.

Although company cars were found to be important, the number one employment benefit for UK workers was actually a good pension contribution (62 per cent), flexible working hours (also 62 per cent) and a high number of holiday days (53 per cent).

In fourth place was private medical insurance (28 per cent), frequent training/CPD (23 per cent), getting a work laptop/tablet (18 per cent), sabattical/career break option (15 per cent and getting a work phone (14 per cent).

The research was carried out by Censuswide in August 2016 on behalf of Skoda UK. Head of fleet for the latter, Henry Williams, said: “Our research shows company cars are very appealing to workers of all ages, but particularly young people.

“We see this trend strongly outside of London, where many companies are based at out-of-town locations – making a car essential for the daily commute,” he added.

Essential or not, it is no coincidence Skoda has a vested interest in company cars. Fortunately, in recent years it has become rather respected in this area of the market, with the Superb offering a strong mix of affordability, economy, style and creature comforts.

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