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Listening to talk radio could land you a speeding ticket

We all know music can affect our moods, but did you know it can also affect the way you drive?

A survey of 1,000 drivers by Canadian online comparison website Kanetix found 48 per cent of heavy metal listeners had between one and three speeding tickets, compared with the 40 per cent average.

Given the often fast-paced tempo of the genre, it’s perhaps not surprising. But the survey did reveal a slightly more dangerous habit: listening to talk radio. Yes, just under half (49 per cent) of chat show listeners lay claim to between one and three speeding tickets, putting the rockers to shame by a whisker.

Kanetix representative Natasha Carr said the reason for chat shows having such an impact could stem from emotional reactions to what’s being said. “When you’re listening to talk radio, you’re often really passionate about what’s on the radio. It could be about your favourite sports team and you’re upset,” Carr told CTV in an interview.

Carr admits the results merely show “we often drive to match the music” and that tempo is likely the root cause, not a specific genre. Rock music tends to be faster compared with folk music, for example. This is backed up by only 37 per cent of folk listeners being caught speeding at least once.

Country music listeners weren’t completely innocent. Alongside rockers, those partial to a bit of country were most likely to get behind the wheel after a few alcoholic beverages, resulting in being charged for driving under the influence.

This is not the first bit of research into music affecting driving habits and certainly not the last. Back in January a survey revealed the ten most dangerous driving songs

 

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