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Majority of British motorists want to retain the right to drive

65 per cent of motorists want to retain the right to drive even though driverless cars could potentially have the ability to take over completely, a survey has revealed.

Just 20 per cent of British motorists think driverless cars are a ‘good idea’ compared with 34 per cent who think they are a ‘bad idea’, according to an independent survey of 1,000 drivers and a poll of IAM RoadSmart’s 92,000 members.

22 per cent, meanwhile, believe driverless cars will ‘be the norm on UK roads’ and 16 per cent think they are an ‘exciting prospect’.

The respondents were told human error is a factor in 95 per cent of road accidents and that it means there is a strong case for computers to take over. 24 per cent of respondents agreed, 38 disagreed and 29 per cent were unsure about the proposition.

A large portion of motorists were, however, in agreement was over the laws around autonomous cars, with 87 per cent saying driving should not be banned once driverless cars were readily available. Yet 92 per cent welcomed an automated system that would stop tailgating.

IAM RoadSmart chief executive Sarah Sillars said: “Technological advances that make driving and riding safer for all road users have to be embraced whole-heartedly – but British motorists and our members, do want the right to drive.

“Intelligent cars will deliver a step change in road safety by targeting the human errors we make from time-to-time.

“One could see a time when motorists might be restricted to driving on designated roads – and possibly just for pleasure rather than for work or getting from A to B.”

IAM RoadSmart recently changed its name from the Institute of Advanced Motorists. It offers motorists advanced driving and riding tests to improve their road safety.

Are fully autonomous cars a good idea or should safety systems merely be used to compliment and kerb human error? Let us know in the comments.

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