All Sections

New TVR promises a lot of carbon fibre loving

More details have emerged of the new TVR, which will go on sale ‘in the coming months’, according to the British marque’s new owner.

TVR said the new car will be its ‘first ever, full production carbon fibre construction’, with an aero chassis and body package developed by F1 legend and the man behind the McLaren F1, Gordon Murray.

The lightweight carbon fibre composite structure will be offered as standard on an initial limited edition production run offered to all who have put down the required £5,000 deposit, before becoming an optional extra. More than 300 deposits have been made.

The mystery TVR is said to utilise Murray’s iStream manufacturing method designed to reduce the weight of the car and the CO2 emissions used in building it.

Costs will also be reduced, as the iStream method makes it possible for the stand-alone tub and shell to be made from carbon fibre composite ‘at a fraction of the cost that other methods allow’, allowing TVR to offer it to customers as ‘a cost-effective option’.

In case your whistle needs more whetting, the new TVR will be the first of at least four in the next ten years and there are rumours of a Cosworth V8 engine under the hood, complete with a good-old fashioned manual gearbox.

TVR chairman Les Edgar said: “Historically, carbon fibre has been reserved for motorsport and high-end supercars, but now TVR will be offering customers a slice of that technology at a fraction of the price.

“The spotlight has been on us from the start, and with the help of Gordon Murray Design and its innovative processes, we have made sure that our new sports car can really shine and deliver beyond expectations.

“The carbon manufacturing process really is a game changer, and one I’m delighted to offer to all of our early adopter Launch Edition customers within the package cost. I am sure those models will be much coveted, but carbon will continue to be available as a cost option.”

TVR cars are often called ‘Trevors’ because the manufacturer was founded by Trevor Wilkinson in 1947. It became synonymous with sports car fun but reliability issues made them unappealing and high manufacturing costs made low-volume production impossible.

Edgar, who took over the brand in 2013, has the difficult task of avoiding the same mistakes. At least the marketing job will be easy, because most petrolheads would sacrifice at least one part of their body to own one.

Comments