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Rideye is a bicycle black box camera for hit and run accidents

We’re all used to the concept of having black boxes, or data recorders, in aircraft, and have started coming to terms with the fact that such systems are being introduced in cars. But could black boxes have a place on the humble bicycle?

Rideye records constantly and saves the footage if it detects an accident.
Rideye records constantly and saves the footage if it detects an accident.

The makers of Rideye certainly think so. This tiny gadget, touted as a data recorder for your bicycle, is fitted with a high-definition camera with a wide-angle lens that allows it to capture everything that occurs on a rider’s journey.

Rideye has 4GB of internal memory, which is enough to capture an hour’s worth of video – probably just about enough for most commutes. However a special 32GB model is also planned, which can record up to 10 hours worth. Both versions record in a continuous loop, with the footage being saved when you turn the system off, or when accelerometers inside the device detect a crash.

Video is recorded at a resolution of 1,280×720 pixels, which, according to the system’s maker, is crisp enough to capture license plates in 90 per cent of cases. Rideye is purportedly quite sturdy, as it’s made from CNC’d ‘aircraft grade’, ‘bullet proof’ aluminium, so it should survive the rigours of most commutes this side of Baghdad.

Rideye’s designer, Cedric Bosch, was inspired to create the system after a friend was seriously injured in a hit and run accident.

Rideye is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter. The minimum required to get the project off the ground is $36,000. Those who contribute $99 get a full Rideye unit, which is a sizeable discount off the expected $149 retail price.

Assuming the project gets off the ground, deliveries will begin around March 2014.

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