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Toyota S-FR concept just wants to be loved

Toyota will reveal a new concept known as the S-FR at the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show that it hopes will ‘make a whole new generation fall in love with driving’.

Details of the Toyota S-FR are thin on the ground, but we can tell you it has space for four(ish) occupants, has been designed to be a ‘fun-to-drive lightweight sports car’ and is meant to be an ‘entry-level model’ aka affordable.

Toyota says the S-FR is ‘incredibly light’ but will offer a ‘smooth’ ride. It measures a measly 3,900mm metres in length, 1,695mm in width and 1,320mm in height. No wonder, then, the ‘S’ part of its name stands for ‘small’.

The front engine and rear-wheel drive format (hence ‘FR’) of the S-FR is meant to give the concept pin-sharp handling and a ‘real sense of communication between the car and driver’ while keeping weight distribution optimal.

It has independent suspension, a long bonnet and wide stance for that traditional sports car look and a six-speed manual transmission for a more involving drive. In other words, it’s should be a huge amount of fun for a modest sum of money, much like the Toyota GT86.

Exactly how much money is unclear, but reports say it could go on sale as early as 2017, with production expected to start in late 2016. The same report claims the S-FR will be powered by a 130hp naturally-aspirated 1.5-litre four-cylinder petrol.

Toyota will show off a number of other concepts at this year’s Tokyo Motor Show, including a curious hot-rod-esque concept with a 1+2 cockpit reminiscent of the McLaren F1 known as the Kikai and the fuel cell-powered FCV Plus.

The undeniably cute Kikai was created by Toyota to ‘explore and emphasise the fundamental appeal of machines; their fine craftsmanship, their beauty simplicity and their fascinating motion’ and it does this by proudly displaying all the goings-on usually hidden from view.

Have a butcher’s at the S-FR and Kikai concepts below and tell us what you think, folks.

Toyota S-FR and Kikai concept pictures

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