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BT invites ISPs to test out triple digit G.fast broadband

BT’s inviting ISPs to test out its ultrafast G.fast broadband technology as part of a series of live trials. 

Tests in lab conditions have already demonstrated that the emerging tech is capable of delivering download speeds of over 700Mbps. Outside the controlled environments of BT’s test facilities the results may be a little different, hence why BT is putting G.fast through its paces in the wild. 

BT’s G.fast trials are currently due to take place in Swansea, Gosforth, Newcastle and Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire and its the latter of the three where ISPs will be able to see what G.fast is capable of.  

BT hasn’t been able to name any names, but says that it expects ‘a number of different ISPs’ to take part in the trial.

Inside BT’s ultrafast G.fast test lab Huntingdon residents will be contacted over the coming weeks to see if they’d like to take part in the trial.  

Like ADSL and FTTC (Fibre to the Cabinet), the top speeds customers get with G.fast will depend greatly on the actual length of the line. BT’s lab tests have shown that with G.fast, copper connections 66 metres long can deliver download and upload speeds of around 700Mbps and 200Mbps. Over shorter 19 metre lines, these speeds jump up to roughly 780Mbps down and 230Mbps up. 

News of the open trial arrives in the wake of TalkTalk announcing a trial of gigabit FTTP (Fibre to the Premises) services in York, as part of a joint venture with Sky and CityFibre

Speeds on FTTP lines don’t degrade over distance and suffer from the same interference issues that copper connections do. 

BT continues to slowly roll out FTTP connections to more homes and businesses. Firms in Wales are due to benefit from BT’s Fibre on Demand programme, a relaunched service that sees companies able to replace the copper last mile of an FTTC connection with a fibre optic link, essentially upgrading it to a full fat FTTP line. Pricing details for this are thin on the ground. Hopefully they’ll be significantly south of what businessman Andrew Goff had to pay

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