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Parliamentarians seek porn almost 300,000 times a year

Computers in Parliament were used for almost 300,000 attempts to access porn in the past 12 months.

With an average of 800 attempts per day, ‘peak porn’ climaxed in November 2012 with 114,844 requests, although there was a Valentine’s Day trough of 15 in February 2013.

The figures were revealed by Parliamentary IT chiefs in response to a Freedom of Information request by megablogging network The Huffington Post UK.

Parliamentarians seek porn almost 300,000 times a year
You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious, etc

Read Recombu Digital’s guide to Parental Internet ControlsA House of Commons spokesperson said the figures could have been inflated by websites which register multiple visits through pop-ups, or third-party software which creates extra interactions with websites.

“We do not consider the data to provide an accurate representation of the number of purposeful requests made by network users. We are not going to restrict Parliamentarians’ ability to carry out research,” they added.

The Houses of Parliament accommodate around 5,000 workers, including 650 MPs and an average House of Lords attendance of 484.

From May 2012, the Parliamentary porn access records break down as:

  • May 2012: 2141
  • June 2012: 2261
  • July 2012: 6024 
  • August 2012: 26,952 
  • September 2012: 15,804
  • October 2012: 3391
  • November 2012: 114,844 
  • December 2012: 6918
  • January 2013: 18494 
  • February 2013: 15 
  • March 2013: 22,470 
  • April 2013: 55,552 
  • May 2013: 18,346 
  • June 2013: 397 
  • July 2013: 15,707

According to Google Trends, UK web searches reached peak porn during Christmas week. Think about that over your turkey in four months’ time.

Prime Minister David Cameron wants the UK’s major ISPs to introduce compulsory opt-out filters for adult websites, covering every customer’s traffic at a network level.

Together, BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media provide around 90 per cent of British domestic internet connections.

Image: Shane Global Language Centres/Flickr

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