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Is this really what smartphones will look like in twenty years?

This mock-up image shows what the phones of the future could resemble — so do you reckon you’ll soon be pocketing a portable device just like this one?

For quite a few years, it wouldn’t really have seemed difficult to have predicted what the smartphone of the future might have looked like. After all, they all seemed to more or less look the same: uninspiring glossy black blocks, their appearance belying their impressive capabilities. However now that huge advances have been made, particularly with the regard to display tech, a whole range of new possibilities have been opened up to make mobiles more exciting than ever.

In research undertaken by BuyMobiles, the company has created the below image to show just what your phone could look like in twenty years’ time:

Image Credit: BuyMobiles

Some of the changes could be predicted. The lack of charging ports, due to wireless charging technology and cloud data transfer taking over, is foreseeable. The addition of “more rear cameras” is another surefire prediction; every time a new phone is advertised it seems to have sprouted another snapper somewhere. The rise of foldable phones is also a trend that we’ve observed recently, with the launch of Samsung’s third generation of such devices. But then things get really interesting…

Related: The Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 is just another foldable flop

A holographic display? Apparently it’s not just the preserve of sci-fi fantasy, as Samsung apparently filed a patent for the tech back in 2019. Even more interestingly, new polymer concepts could give rise to a type of “self-healing” display that will banish those painful memories of smashing your iPhone screen the week after buying it.

What’s perhaps more important than the style of the smartphone, is its sustainability. Phones of the future are likely to have a significantly reduced amount of plastic packaging, and new eco0ratings systems may grade devices on their durability, repairability, recyclability, climate efficiency and resource efficiency.

 

 

 

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