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Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge quick charge breakdown and test results

Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge battery life test: How long does the S7 and S7 Edge take to quick charge using Samsung’s ‘Adaptive Fast Charging’ feature? Check out our full S7 quick charge tests for the results.

Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge: Quick charging explained

There are actually two different models of S7, one with Samsung’s own Exynos processor and another using Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 instead – and the same goes for the S7 Edge. The Exynos models of the S7 and S7 Edge support Samsung’s own ‘Adaptive Fast Charging’ tech for quickly powering up, while the Snapdragon models use Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 2.0 tech (rather than the newer, much faster Quick Charge 3.0, for some reason).

You can actually disable Quick Charge in the battery settings menu, in case you’re worried about your phone overheating if you leave it charging overnight. Head the the settings and then battery and scroll to the bottom and you’ll find the ‘Fast charging cable’ option. This is enabled by default. If you disable it, standard charging will be used instead.

Read next: Samsung Galaxy S7 review

Samsung Galaxy S7 Fast Charge test results

Our S7 review model was the Exynos version, using Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging tech. We used the bundled quick charge cable to power up the S7 direct from the mains and a complete charge from 0-100 percent took 86 minutes.

After half an hour, the S7 was 41 percent charged. And after one hour of charging, the S7 was up to 88 percent battery charge.

The results are comparable to similar fast charge tests from last year’s big phones, including the Galaxy S6. However, we’re expecting new phones like the LG G5 to beat the S7 thanks to its support for Quick Charge 3.0.

Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge Fast Charge test results

Our S7 Edge review model was also the Exynos version, once again using Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging tech. We used the bundled cable to charge the S7 Edge direct from the mains, and a complete charge from 0-100 percent took 95 minutes.

After half an hour, the S7 Edge was 40 percent charged. And after an hour, the S7 Edge was up to 78 percent charge.

The reason the S7 Edge takes longer to charge than the vanilla S7 is the bigger battery stuffed inside. While the S7 uses a 3000mAh cell, the S7 Edge packs in a mighty 3600mAh battery. Of course, the S7 Edge still performs well compared with last year’s bigger handsets, which typically took between 90 and 120 minutes to charge up to full. However, we’re once again expecting new 2016 handsets packing the Snapdragon 820 chipset to charge noticeably faster.

Check out our full Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge camera review and our in-depth S7 review and S7 Edge review.

Big thanks to Carphone Warehouse for our Galaxy S7 review sample. You can grab the S7 from Carphone now, from £36 per month or £569 SIM-free.

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