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Nintendo Switch Unboxing and Setup (UK model)

Nintendo Switch unboxing and setup: We’ve unboxed Nintendo’s new Switch home console days ahead of its formal launch, so you know what to expect in-box, along with a look at its setup process.

If you’re reading this (and obviously you are), there’s a chance you missed the early unboxing of a Switch which turned out to feature a stolen console from the US. The Switch is set to formally launch on March 3 in markets including the US and UK, but Nintendo has granted us an early look at the hardware along with the ability to get set up and running.

For such a small console, the Switch comes in a pretty sizeable box, with product photos and Nintendo’s white on red logo occupying most of the faces. There’s a rundown of what you can expect inside and lifting the lid, a diagram covering the console’s basic setup and modes.

Scroll down for our video unboxing and setup video, taking a closer look at our first moments with the Switch.

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Nintendo Switch unboxing and setup: A tour of the Switch

Open the box up completely and you’re presented with the console itself and both controllers; the left and right Joy-Cons. In our case, we were lucky enough to receive the neon blue and neon red options, which offer a little more visual flare than the standard dark grey variants. Each item is individually wrapped and packaged in a lift-out card tray, which covers the rest of the components that make up the fundamental Switch experience.

On the left resides all the necessary wiring; Nintendo has included an HDMI cable (black) and a hardwired power adapter with a Type-C USB connection on the end, marking a shift away from proprietary connections as seen with the company’s 3DS and previous home consoles. On the right sits the Switch’s dock. It’s a simple textured black cuboid with a slot for the console, the bottom of which features locating ‘pins’ and a male USB-C connector.

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On the back there’s channelling for cable management behind a fold-down plastic door and ports for power in, HDMI out and a USB-A connection, presumably to power the option Pro Controller or Joy-Con charging grip.

Nintendo Switch unboxing and setup: Joy-Cons

Speaking of the charging grip, contrary to initial reports, the Switch doesn’t come with a Joy-Con charging grip in-box but rather a simple plastic grip that houses the Joy-Cons with light piping for the power indicators, but no USB connectivity whatsoever. That means you’ll have to dock your Joy-Cons back into the Switch itself when you want to charge them or fork out £24.99 for the charging grip if you feel the need for the additional functionality. Conversely, the Pro Controller is available for £69.99 at launch.

The last pieces of the puzzle sit above and below the Joy-Con grip. Simply dubbed Joy-Con straps, these black plastic elements feature a fabric wrist strap, slide over the rails built into each Joy-Con and lock with a small latch at their respective bases. They’re designed for those who typically don’t leave the Joy-Cons connected to the grip or the Switch itself, or hold value when playing multiplayer games such as those found in launch title 1-2-Switch. They also act as extenders for each Joy-Con’s SL and SR button and can be purchased separately for £4.99 in both black (as found in-box) or neon blue and neon red.

Nintendo Switch unboxing and setup: Switch interface and menus

As for setup, right now, ahead of the console's formal launch there's not a huge amount you can do. The Switch takes you through region, network and profile setup in that order before presenting you with a clean and simple home screen that features slots for games as well as news, the Nintendo eShop, the album (for shared screenshots), the settings menu and power options.

The Nintendo Switch hits stores on March 3rd with a pre-order price of £279.99. Stay tuned for a full Switch review and more very soon.

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